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Archive for the ‘masters course’ Category

Greenwashing is everywhere, if we are to believe Terrachoice. Their Sins of Greenwashing 2010 report tells us how the number of greenwashing incidents continues to grow, mostly with companies making claims on how they have dealt with some of the less significant impacts, while omiting all sorts of other issues. Companies get more penalised for sticking their head above the parapet and actually dealing with some of their impacts, than for burying it in the sand and ignoring the whole agenda. But how does a company choose when and how to report, so they can be taken seriously for their efforts? What is enough to feel confident about public disclosure?

I have been analysing the data from 10 international leisure hotel chains further- our research was conducted for 9 national consumer associations and published in March 2011, and presented at ITB Berlin. With my academic hat on, I am now delving more deeply into the data. There’s some really interesting lessons to be learned, which I shall present to ICRT alumni in London on Wed 13th July (alumni know where and when we meet monthly). Here’s a sneak preview: (more…)

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You can read in Green Lodging News about the Wyndham Virginia Crossings Hotel & Conference Center, who have  launched an offer arguably to attract more green customers- traveling in hybrid and electric vehicles. With its new “Go Green, Get Green” package, guests who arrive at the Wyndham Virginia Crossings Hotel in a hybrid vehicle and stay for two nights or more through September 1, 2011, will receive a $25 Visa gift card. It is most unlikely it will attract customers, and I do not believe the package was created for that purpose, but to raise awareness of Wyndham as a brand. So let’s put this in context. (more…)

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Do marketers care about sustainability, and should they? You can guess the answer to both. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme helps us to understand better where we are and where we want to go (more…)

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Too much to do, not enough time- There are many reasons to be responsible, and every one of these has an impact on your marketability- remember marketing isn’t just communication or sales. Here’s a guide to help you prioritise new actions, and evaluate those you’ve already taken. (more…)

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Who can teach small producers about selling added value, from authenticity and responsible practices? Here’s an example from Egypt to reflect on.

Fansina (in Arabic, Sinai Art) produces beaded bags and purses in St Katherine, South Sinai, Egypt. It started as a cooperative employing 300 Bedouin women, and due to the legal difficulties in staying as an NGO, it is now run as a social enterprise.

The products are great, the price is good: the distribution and communication are poor. (more…)

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The fragmentation of supply adds to the marketing costs of each individual supplier. Destination partnerships to jointly market attractions the most common- and necessary. The Mekong Private Sector Development Facility, part of the International Finance Corporation- World Bank Group  has produced a campaign to encourage longer stay in the typical touring destinations in the Mekong which to date has proven very successful (more…)

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Marketing is both part of the problem, and I believe part of the solution. What do you think green tourism marketing is? At one extreme, claims of charitable donations and ecosavings, at the other extreme, hippy cycling holidays carrying all your camping gear (often in wet weather).

Basically, green marketing has been done very poorly because very few marketers understand responsible practices, while few companies that behave responsibly engage well in marketing. Yet marketing professionals have the opportunity, and the duty, to make all of our products greener. The scale of the challenge ahead is so great this can no longer be a middle class niche market issue. All consumers must be engaged in consuming, knowingly or unknowingly, a greater proportion of green products. (more…)

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